Urban Fantasy Series Recommendations.

As folks know, I love the Benedict Jacka books! Currently reading Burned, the latest book. In the same vein, I would add the Rivers of London series by Ben Arronovitch and the Lockwood & Co. by Jonathan Stroud. They’re children’s books but they are still enjoyable.
I read Preternatural Affairs a month or so ago but I still can’t quite make up my mind about it. That’s partly why I haven’t reviewed them yet. I do like the way S.M. Reine handles angels and demons but I just can’t quite put my finger on what I actually think about them.

Tech Tip for Writers #65: How to use Google Street View

Until I can go to the places I write about, Google Maps, Earth and Street View are the next best thing.

WordDreams...

Tech Tips for Writers is an (almost) weekly post on overcoming Tech Dread. I’ll cover issues that friends, both real-time and virtual, have shared. Feel free to post a comment about a question you have. I’ll cover it in a future Tip.

Q: I can’t find enough detail about a particular area of the world my character visits. Any suggestions?

A: Try Google Street View. It’s a wonderful way to explore settings for your writing Here’s how to use it:

  • First, you must have Google Earth. It’s a free download and I’ve never had problems with the install. Take a minute to do that. I’ll wait.
  • Done? That was fast. Here’s what you do next:

View original post 353 more words

10 Tips for Steampunk Writers

Ever thought of writing Steampunk but been unsure what exactly needs to be in the story? I recommend having a read of this.

WordDreams...

steampunkIf you’d asked me a year ago whether I would read a steampunk novel, I would have had to pull up my trusty Google to figure out what you were asking:

a sub-genre of science fiction and fantasy that includes social or technological aspects of the 19th century (the steam) usually with some deconstruction of, re-imagining of, or rebellion against parts of it (the punk) –from Steampunk.com

No way. Fantasy? 19th Century? Rebellion? Not my areas of interest.

Then I met Emma Jan Holloway’s Baskerville Affair trilogy. True to its genre (well, steampunk is a sub-genre), she includes all those tantalizing elements and more–magic, steam-powered machines, automatons that appear more real than ruse, mechanical mice and birds imbued with invisible spirits, electronic marvels that run daily lives as electricity and oil does ours, powerful egotistical men controlling the lives of London citizens–and Sherlock Holmes. What a marvelous mixture of mayhem!…

View original post 346 more words