#SundayBlogShare #CampNaNoWriMo July 2016: Days 1 & 2

CNW_Participant

Word Count: 1,680 words

Forgive me for the two hashtags in the title of this post. I am experimenting with Twitter again.

A respectable start really considering I junked my previous idea 24 hours before this session started. I know I said I would wait until midnight, just open a document and just start writing but that didn’t quite pan out. The story I am writing is a very old one that I have talked about before on here.

You might remember me asking a question about rewriting back in January of last year and the picture that was posted with it. Well, that story decided to rear its head again whilst I was running errands on Thursday and I decided to give it another go.

At its very core, the original plot that I conceived for the story nearly 10 years ago now is about a young vampire author who rescues an abused neko slave boy and is fighting not just for justice of the boy but also against the slavery system in her country. Naturally, that has developed over the years as I have worked on other stories and life took it’s course. Now, there is also a romance/family plot that is running along the slavery one. My FMC author/social worker is in a relationship with my MMC author/civil servant vampire and their parents disapproving for various reasons, the author’s sister going out with a werewolf (so a vampire/werewolf plot possible too) as well as my MMC’s brother discovering he is gay and unable to come to terms with it.

This story, for now, feels right for this session so I am going to stick with it and see what happens.

How is Camp going for you? Is it going well or are you struggling already? Don’t be afraid to comment below.

 

Advertisements

Urban Fantasy versus Paranormal Romance

Now, this isn’t something I have thought too deeply about but perhaps I should as a (primarily) fantasy writer who is looking to get published. Especially in recent years, my work has gone from high fantasy to urban to low and, inevitably with me, all them will include a romantic story somewhere along the way. So is my work paranormal romance or is it a fantasy story with a romantic storyline? I don’t know to be honest.

Whilst reading this, it got me thinking about the Mills & Boon/Harlequin Nocturne books. These seem to straddle the Urban Fantasy/Paranormal Romance genre line (if there is one) but somehow, I think maybe the two genre’s just go so far hand in hand that they should be classed as one and the same when appropriate naturally. In some case’s it is appropriate to delineate between the two, especially in Michele Hauf’s Moon Kissed and After The Kiss in my opinion, since she seems to focus more on the romance than any real story, whilst I think the Mills & Boon Nocturne novel that really holds the two genre’s in balance is Vivi Anna’s The Vampire’s Kiss novel.

 

Where Landsquid Fear to Tread

You know, despite all the subgenre studies we’ve done here, I still have a hard time differentiating between urban fantasy and paranormal romance. I mean, logically, I can spout off definitions but I have a hard time with actual books because a lot of times they read very similar to each other.

Urban fantasy is fantasy that takes place in a city. It isn’t necessarily contemporary. And paranormal romance is just a romance with paranormal elements. There’s a lot of variables on both–time period, setting, types of fantastical/paranormal elements, etc.

But from what I’ve seen, both tend to be modern-day in urban environments. And both tend to have a romance plot/subplot and a non-romance plot/subplot, and often times they seem to be of almost equal importance.

I’ve run into this in other places as well, particularly between cozy mysteries and romance. A lot of it seems to come down…

View original post 119 more words

Book Review: Writing the Paranormal Novel by Steven Harper

So as well as reading the Auto-Correct book, I have read this book.

Writing the Paranormal Novel is about exactly that, writing a paranormal novel. This book does focus mostly on Urban Fantasy and covers everything includes what makes a novel a paranormal or fantasy novels, working out what magical elements are going to be in the work, if the paranormal elements are secret in the world or in the public domain and if the magic is persecuted or dominates lives, magical culture, research, whether to have clichés  keeping the magic/paranormal real, plotting, fight scenes, dialogue and a whole section on getting published.

This book was the first one I ever bought on Kindle and so far, it is proving to be some of the best money I have spent. Written in a way that is easy to understand without condescending, it provides excellent information on world and character building and gets a writer (often addressed as you and yours in the book) to think about the things that they may not have considered before, such as about the economy of the magical world and fight scenes, especially if you have characters like werewolves. It also covers the use of clichés and how to craft and handle those when creating the magical creatures in the novel. Whilst some of the information is available in other how to write books, this is completely focused on the paranormal novel and crafting the elements in that book. It also looks at the idea of story arcs, in books and across series as well as general plotting.

This book definitely covers everything possible and is all-encompassing, which I have not found with any other how to book I have read or looked at. I am trying to think of anything negative with this book and finding nothing to say. I know, I know. It sounds bad to say, I know, but it is the honest truth.

I could not recommend this book highly enough as a must have and must read for anyone wanting to write paranormal stories (short stories or novels). It is certainly a reason I keep my Kindle nearby when writing so I can dip in sometimes to find what I need when I need help.