#CampNaNoWriMo July 2016: Day 21

CNW_Participant

Word Count: 13,275 words

So a little behind still but I have pulled back a lot so it’s not too bad.

My FMC got her sister off home, got some work done before running out to post it. It was whilst she was out posting that she discovered the slave she had protected the previous day just dumped in a bin in a bag. She got him to a volunteer/charity medical centre for slaves and discovers that MMC2 volunteers there. Once she had handed the slave to the medical staff, she got talking with MMC2 and discovers that he is actually the landlord of the pub. My FMC is also starting to like him even more as a friend than the acquaintance they had been in the past. That’s good as it plays into the love triangle thing.

After checking in on the slave, my FMC went home, slept and answering messages she had received. She also spent time musing on the differences between the country that this story takes place and the one that another set of stories I write. Both countries are apart of the same country so this is high fantasy combined with urban fantasy. Bit odd but it works right? Am I alone here?

As for what comes next, I am thinking I need to bring MMC1 back into the story so that will be today’s task I suspect. How are things going for you? Good? Bad? Hope you are still having fun.

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Camp #NaNoWriMo April 2016: Days 18-22

CNW_Participant

Current Word Count: 18,185 words

This draft just keeps kicking up new information. The FMC’s mum is backing my FMC’s beliefs about being able to be so much better and is supportive of her going to an elite magic school, rather than the dark magic one the rest of the family goes to. The FMC has also proved to be a bit devious by using her place as the unwanted outcast to get money from her non-dad to do her school supply shopping and to stay in a hotel for a few days. The hotel is because her mum and non-dad are kicking all the kids out of the house for a few days to do a ritual that needs complete silence. I am trying to figure out how the shopping trip will go whilst relaying the same or similar information from the first draft.

In the last couple of days, I’ve realised that this story takes place not in our world but in another AU, high fantasy type world. It seems to be connected to other stories I have done in the past in a separate world that has been developing  for some years now. So that’s thrown up some new considerations, like government, world set up, it’s connection to other place, etc. At the same time, it has allayed some of my concerns about timing within the story. I don’t have to stick to the calendar of our world and I can draw upon elements from the other stories. This should be interesting.

So here’s hoping that when I post next weekend, I will be able to display a winner banner at the top of the post. How’s your writing going? Good? Bad? Had any revelations? Good luck folks!

Three rules for naming your fantasy world

Writers of fantasy, particularly high fantasy, should definitely have a read of this.

Matthew Wright

In my mis-spent early twenties, a friend and I created a fantasy world map for our RPG sessions.

I had to share this pic, taken by She Who Must Be Obeyed. We end up in some interesting places, sometimes. Just in case anybody googles "Stockton Mine". To build a world, start by wearing a hard hat (like mine).

Yes, I played Dungeons and Dragons – and later a game we invented ourselves to get around the sillier D&D ideas. The world was designed around what we might call the ‘rule of funny’, with place names made up mostly of bad puns and motorcycle parts manufacturers. This meant we had waters such as the Greg Lake, next door to rolling hills such as the Sinfields. And there was the Hergest Ridge – though we didn’t have the Old Fields. We also riffed on Tolkien’s unfortunate habit of ending place names with ‘-dor’. You know… Backdor. Frontdor. Dianador. Groan.

That does raise a point for those of us engaged in (more serious) fantasy world-building. Place names gotta be credible. Tolkien, inevitably, set…

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Urban Fantasy versus Paranormal Romance

Now, this isn’t something I have thought too deeply about but perhaps I should as a (primarily) fantasy writer who is looking to get published. Especially in recent years, my work has gone from high fantasy to urban to low and, inevitably with me, all them will include a romantic story somewhere along the way. So is my work paranormal romance or is it a fantasy story with a romantic storyline? I don’t know to be honest.

Whilst reading this, it got me thinking about the Mills & Boon/Harlequin Nocturne books. These seem to straddle the Urban Fantasy/Paranormal Romance genre line (if there is one) but somehow, I think maybe the two genre’s just go so far hand in hand that they should be classed as one and the same when appropriate naturally. In some case’s it is appropriate to delineate between the two, especially in Michele Hauf’s Moon Kissed and After The Kiss in my opinion, since she seems to focus more on the romance than any real story, whilst I think the Mills & Boon Nocturne novel that really holds the two genre’s in balance is Vivi Anna’s The Vampire’s Kiss novel.

 

Where Landsquid Fear to Tread

You know, despite all the subgenre studies we’ve done here, I still have a hard time differentiating between urban fantasy and paranormal romance. I mean, logically, I can spout off definitions but I have a hard time with actual books because a lot of times they read very similar to each other.

Urban fantasy is fantasy that takes place in a city. It isn’t necessarily contemporary. And paranormal romance is just a romance with paranormal elements. There’s a lot of variables on both–time period, setting, types of fantastical/paranormal elements, etc.

But from what I’ve seen, both tend to be modern-day in urban environments. And both tend to have a romance plot/subplot and a non-romance plot/subplot, and often times they seem to be of almost equal importance.

I’ve run into this in other places as well, particularly between cozy mysteries and romance. A lot of it seems to come down…

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Subgenre Study: High and Low Fantasy

A very interesting look at the differences between high and low fantasy.

Where Landsquid Fear to Tread

Today we will be looking at High and Low Fantasy and the confusion surrounding the terminology.  It has nothing to do with how good the stories are (Eragon, for example, is high fantasy but most would argue not high quality) but, rather, which fantasy tropes they incorporate.

High Fantasy, sometimes called Epic Fantasy, generally encompasses “traditional” fantasy tropes.  It takes place on a made-up, entirely fictional world, and usually incorporates magic and monsters into the plot.  Low Fantasy, on the other hand, takes place in the real world and may be more subtle in its fantastical elements.

Lord of the Rings is the quintessential High Fantasy but, according to some people, so is Harry Potter.  See, High Fantasy breaks down into three subtypes: 1) the completely made-up world, like Middle Earth, 2) the travel from the real world to a fantasy world, like Narnia, and 3) a made-up world within…

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