Why They Write

This caught my eye a few days ago but I am only just getting round to reblogging it now because I’ve been thinking about my own reasons for writing.

I agree with those that say that the reason changes day-to-day. For me, I write because my mind keeps coming up with stories, even before I realised what I was doing when I was younger. I suppose when I was younger, it was just my imagination coming up with games to play but as I got older, it continued and I started writing down the stories (a lot of fan fiction) because one of my school teachers pointed out that I had a gift for it.

It is also partly because I had just found my genre, the type of books and stories I liked to read and write, around the same time. JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series inspired millions of children around the world and I am one of those. Even now, I go back to the premise of the Harry Potter series and Enid Blyton’s school stories, especially the Malory Towers series occasionally.

I love fantasy stories, I enjoy school stories and over the years, I have also come to enjoy romance, crime, drama and some comedy and sci-fi stories. As I have read them, I have incorporated that in my writing. My writing can become dark in places but it can also be light.

What is it about them? It’s the escapism. It’s the discovering a world different to our own, sometimes right on our doorsteps. It’s the common premise of school that most people will be able to relate to. It’s the rooting for the characters to be together, the solving of a puzzle, the everyday dilemmas that we experience in our lives and the fabulous funny moments that we think of later which makes you smile and laugh out loud.

Even in the stories set in a place different from our own, there is the baseline of common themes and occurrences in our lives. That’s what attracts me to those sorts of stories and probably attracts many, many others to them too.

Reading and writing are inextricably interlinked I feel. You can’t do one without the other.

I also write because it is a type of therapy and escapism. When the life is getting stressful and tough, it is a nice way to escape for a while and to get out all those feelings through characters on to the physical (or virtual!) page. If I didn’t have an outlet for those sorts of feelings, and others, I don’t know where I would be.

I would love to get paid to write and maybe that will happen in the future but for now, it’s therapy, escapism and an outlet for all the stories clamouring in my head.

Is my answer clichéd? Perhaps but that’s how I feel today. Who knows? Tomorrow, I might have a completely different answer.

Legends of Windemere

Kenshin Himura (How I feel) Kenshin Himura

Sorry!  I totally forgot that I was going to list people’s answers and reasons to Monday’s question.  Please check out the blogs and published works of everyone:

“I’m on board with most of that but I write poetry and know there is no money in that.” The Mirror Obscura

“I love writing because I’m totally addicted to it since the day when I started reading “anything” so seriously” Insight

“For me as a total readerholic and mental escape artist all my life, the writing came late, but now that particular joy of creating worlds, people, dragons, scenarios – whatever – can’t be matched by anything else that I’ve ever done.” Jo Robinson

“I think the reason evolves over time. I began writing as a way to express myself in a healing way. But then I began writing poetry. Poetry is a great self-expression for me and I…

View original post 852 more words

Advertisements

Film Review: Keeping Mum

I’ve been looking forward to being finally able to review this film. It’s one of those film that I always seem to miss the first bit of when ever it is on Film4.

The little village of Little Wallop is your typical English village but Gloria Goodfellow (Kristin Scott Thomas) is going crazy.

Her vicar husband, Walter Goodfellow (Rowan Atkinson), is so obsessed with writing the perfect sermon, he is completely ignoring his wife, who is having an affair with her American golf instructor Lance (Patrick Swayze). His seventeen year old nymphomaniac daughter Holly (Tamsin Egerton) has a different boyfriend every week and his son Petey (Toby Parkes) is the victim of school bullies.

Gloria is praying for a miracle when a new housekeeper arrives. Sweet old lady Grace (Maggie Smith) is the answer to all Gloria’s prayers. She has a unique way of keeping house and even more unique way of dealing with problems.

This is a great British comedy with an all-star cast with some brilliant laugh out loud moments. The film shows off the best in British talent from the actors in front of the camera and the people behind it. The script is a great example of British wit and humour whilst the film locations, in Cornwall and on the Isle of Wight, shows just how beautiful the English countryside can be, away from the city streets that seem to be the norm. It draws the audience in right from the start and keeps them entertained from start to finish.

This is a comedy film but Atkinson shows he is capable of carrying off a very serious role away from his iconic bumbling Mr Bean character whilst Smith, who is normally seen in rather staid roles such as Professor McGonagall in the Harry Potter franchise, is perfect as the fun and very British Grace who seems to always be looking for a good cup of tea.

The film features a lot of sexual references, nudity and some strong language and whilst overt, it does not detract from the film. It is however a good reason why the BBFC rated this film as a 15. I would not recommend watching this film with young kids around as this is not a Jacqueline Wilson type of story, who has a book by the same name. It is slow in places but it does succeed in keeping its audience even then with other elements.

This is a great film to enjoy for a night in, whether alone or with friends and will leave you giggling, laughing and at least smiling through out. Whilst it won’t have you holding your sides or anything like that, it is great fun, with a wonderfully British feel to it.