#CampNaNoWriMo July 2016 Analysis

CNW_Participant

Final Word Count: 15,242 words

No win here obviously but 15k is still pretty good.

The vampire/slave story was a rewrite of the very first completely original work I wrote about 8 years ago but I wanted to rewrite it from a new angle I had in my mind. I found it really worked well once I actually got onto that part of the story. I think a bit more work, it could really be something. However, this story seems to have suffered from a problem I have noted before: I spent too much time setting stuff up.

The time spent setting the story up is good I suppose for like my April one where I needed to do more set up. I had to figure out world and plot issues to get it working but for a story like last month’s, when I knew exactly what the story was, it proved very annoying. The werewolf and family stuff is interesting and has a place in the world but was it needed here? No, I don’t think so. It is possibly why I didn’t hit my 20k target. I also spent the equivalent of a week and a bit not writing. I think that’s because I got bored with the story due to the set up stuff.

My thoughts need to turn to how I am going to combat such issues in the future. Admittedly, I am uncertain except to say planning. I think we all know how I am with that now. On the other hand, like last month, planning possibly wasn’t the answer for last month’s issue. I need to figure out WHY I am focusing so much energy and so many words on the beginning of the story. Surely it should be the middle that is the bloated part.

If anyone can offer any insight or help on this, I would be very grateful for it.

Going forward for the next month, I am returning to my April story. During the time I wasn’t writing, I was thinking about that one, which is good because it means my plan to take a break and recharge to continue writing that one has worked. However, I am considering being a little patchy and jumping scenes. I have started writing a scene from the end of the story where my FMC meets her father. It’s a scene I have played with for a while and if it gets me back into the story after my break, maybe it will be good. If it doesn’t work, jumping scenes, so be it. I will go back to being linear but I want to at least try it.

How did the last month go for you? A Camp win or a personal victory? Got a plan for the story or just binning it? It happens and that’s good I think. Sometimes, something is just not good. No matter what happens or did happen, know you are amazing for taking on the challenge.

Happy Yorkshire Day folks!

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Keep Writing!

The intention of this post really is to get an idea of who is still writing after National Novel Writing Month has finished and to give a little advice. Have people fallen by the wayside? Are they still writing? Are they working on the same story or another one?

Santa might be coming but don’t stop writing! Source: Google Images

It is post-NaNoWriMo and I am still writing the same story and it is still throwing up surprises. I am glad it is as it makes continuing to write it a joy. Let’s face it, once the amazing energy of the month of November has gone and we get ourselves ready for Santa to come, it is very easy to stop and give up. Having a goal to work towards has helped me as I am very goal orientated I have realised in the last few years but for others, it might be something completely different. The love of the story, the characters, the world the story is set in… Any manner of things can keep us writing.

Everyone has heard the advice to write everyday and it is possibly clichéd and overused but hearing it so often can only show that maybe it is good advice to follow. If you stop, it can be difficult to start again. It is a possible reason why people struggle with New Years Resolutions. We do it for a while, stop then pick it up again. The same goes with writing and if you wrote everyday during November, why not continue to write everyday? What about starting a journal or blog of some sort? Dreams, life, books, films; you could chronicle any number of things by sitting down and writing everyday.

If you loved your story from November and didn’t finish, why not keep going with it? If you did, go you! But keep going! Keep writing! If you joined write-in’s during NaNoWriMo, why not arrange more so people can set the guilt monkeys on you? See if your region has regular ones through the year.

In January and February, the NaNoWriMo website will be updated to give editing hints and tips and to get you going. Editing and rewriting is, perhaps, the toughest part of writing any type of story, from the short story to the novelling epics. Get your manuscript ready for then. Get it finished. Put it away to let it breathe. Work on something else then, in January, whilst hung over (or otherwise!), get it out and start reading through.

Just Don’t Stop Writing!

So who’s with me? Who’s writing? Or am I a lone voice shouting to no one in particular?

The Worst Ways to Begin Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents

Something to consider when preparing a manuscript to send off to agents.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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No one reads more prospective novel beginnings than literary agents.

They’re the ones on the front lines, sifting through inboxes and slush piles. And they’re the ones who can tell us which Chapter One approaches are overused and cliché, as well as which techniques just plain don’t work.

Below find a smattering of feedback from experienced literary agents on what they hate to see the first pages of a writer’s submission. Avoid these problems and tighten your submission!

False beginnings

I don’t like it when the main character dies at the end of Chapter One. Why did I just spend all this time with this character? I feel cheated.”
- Cricket Freeman, The August Agency

I dislike opening scenes that you think are real, then the protagonist wakes up. It makes me feel cheated.”
- Laurie McLean, Foreword Literary

In science fiction

A sci-fi…

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