Rivers of London Rap Video

Remember the Rivers of London rap I posted a few months ago? For those that don’t, it is rap song based on the Peter Grant book series by Ben Aaronovitch, which starts with Rivers of London. There is now a video to go with the song, executive produced by Aaronovitch himself!

Watch it for yourself here:

Lyrics and Performed by: Ben Bailey Smith
Director: Matt Bloom
Producer and Composer: Mikis Michaelides
Visual FX: Sam Highfield
Executive Producer: Ben Aaronovitch

What do you reckon to Ben Bailey Smith? A good Peter Grant? Would you like someone else? Who would you cast as the other characters in the books if the series ever became a TV series or film? Comment below!

 

Related Content:

Rivers of London Rap: https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2013/12/03/rivers-of-london-rap/

New Artwork for Rivers of London: https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2014/02/25/new-artwork-for-rivers-of-london/

Rivers of London Review: https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2013/05/11/goodreads-review-rivers-of-london-by-ben-aaronovitch/

Moon Over Soho Review: https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2013/05/11/goodreads-moon-over-soho-by-ben-aaronovitch/

Whispers Under Ground Review: https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2013/05/11/goodreads-review-whispers-under-ground-by-ben-aaronovitch/

Broken Homes Review: https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2013/07/18/book-review-broken-homes-by-ben-aaronovitch/

Google Maps for Rivers of London, Moon Over Soho and Whispers Under Ground: https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2013/07/04/google-map-for-ben-aaronovitchs-moon-over-soho/https://sleepybookdragon.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/whispers-under-ground-google-map-by-ben-aaronovitch/

World Book Night 2014

World Book Night takes place on 23rd April this year. Find out more at http://www.worldbooknight.org/

Blog A Book Etc

Looking over the selection of books for World Book Night 2014 and I came across my beloved Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch. A little swell of happiness welled up in my heart and my want to read further into the second book has increased.

Rivers of London

You are probably getting sick of seeing this book on my blog but it was a great read and the second one goes even further into the story of PC Grant. By my own admission the story is quite hard to believe but really does get you hooked in to the point that you just have to know what happens next.

There are also other books included in the WBN list which have at some point taken my interest however I am yet to read. Out of the 20 books selected my favourites are shown below:

The Humans by Matt Haig

Confessions of a GP By Dr Benjamin Daniels

Theodore Boone by John Grisham

So these are my three top choices under River’s…

View original post 28 more words

New Artwork for Rivers of London

Aaronovitch has also been revealing artwork but the artwork is for an imaginary alternative paperback cover. It has been done by Wayne Reynolds, an artist he met at a convention in Belgium.

Aaronovitch has said LIMITED EDITION prints of the image MAY be available soon.

 

Rivers of London Rap

Ben Aaronovitch has posted a link to a rap done about his books. Composed and written by Mikis Michaelides (Aaronovitch’s nephew) and comedian and 4 O’Clock Club star, Doc Brown, you can check out the blog post about it here:  http://temporarilysignificant.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/rivers-of-london-rap_2.html and the actual rap here: http://libbylibby2.tumblr.com/post/68765662059/the-rivers-of-london-rap-written-composed-and

Whispers Under Ground Google Map by Ben Aaronovitch

So just like he has done so with the previous two books, Aaronovitch has created a Google Map marking different locations from the third Peter Grant book, Whispers Under Ground. You can check it out here. He has also said on his blog that he will be creating a Google Map for Broken Homes locations when the book is finally released in the US.

Broken Homes is out now here in the UK and due out in the US in February 2014.

Book Review: Broken Homes by Ben Aaronovitch

Can I just say, I love the cover of this and the other books!

Yes, it has been a few weeks since I last did a review (not surprising since I have focused on Camp NaNoWriMo) but this is the “certain” book I have read. Yes, I know this book is not due out until next Thursday (25th July 2013) but I received my copy a couple of days ago due to having it on pre-order at Waterstones.

The Folly is working through its list of Little Crocodiles, on the trail of the Faceless Man when Peter Grant and his boss, Thomas Nightingale, is called to look into an RTC (Road Traffic Collision) turned Murder case in Crawley where a man by the name of Robert Weil is discovered to have a connection to a mutilated body in a forest. Without being able to step back for a breather, Peter is called to investigate a one-under on the Underground of a town planner and a stolen magic book.

Things get weird though when he hears of odd things happening in a housing estate block flats South of the River, which has been built by an eccentric and seems to have some sort of secret running through its core.

Peter’s got a full case load again and London just got weirder! (If that’s possible!)

This book follows on nicely from the previous book, with The Folly’s investigation into the Faceless Man and grabs attention from the start, featuring all the usual wit and laugh out loud writing readers have come to expect from Aaronovitch and his compelling character, Peter Grant. The opening does read like a summary and it did catch me off initially but it is easy to read and certainly, with hindsight, it is possibly how Peter would receive an update on the investigation.

A host of characters from previous books return, including the Gods and Goddesses of the River Thames, Peter’s dad and the Irregulars and The Quiet People discovered at the end of the last book. Admittedly, they do seem a little shoe horned in and I think Aaronovitch could have explained what language Peter’s mum speaks to him in and translated it. I struggled to understand what was being said, even after re-reading those bits.

I do like the way he combined all the seemingly unconnected threads together into one story line and certainly upped the tension with events at the end of the book, leading to a great (if slightly predictable) twist at the end.

As usual, you can tell Antonovich’s love for the city and how well he knows it. I know I have mentioned this before, but his ability to describe London and all the locations of the novel is fantastic and brilliantly done for a person, such as I, who has never been or has been down just once.

I have already stated a few negatives about this book but I feel it is also worth mentioning that the story seems to finish then restart again near the end. Whilst it is obvious as to why this happened and provides a good cliffhanger leading into the next book, I do feel as if the structure is slightly broken due to it but then again I don’t see really how it can be rejigged to prevent this issue. Maybe I should just put it down to the charm of Aaronovitch’s writing…

As well as the actual novel, if you get your copy from Waterstones, you will also get a short story exclusive to Waterstones, taking place in the Covent Garden branch of the chain, featuring a poltergeist activity and taking place possibly before this novel. It is amusing and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Certainly it ends with a message we should all take to heart in this day and age of internet, TV and films.

So my ultimate verdict on Broken Homes? An excellent addition to the series and I will definitely re-read this one, along with the others, whilst waiting feverishly for the next.

 

Book Review: Fated by Benedict Jacka

Fated is the first book in a series following chance mage, Alex Verus, as he runs a store in Camden Town, London, whilst trying to run from his past and avoid dealing with the magical Council as much as possible. Unfortunately, his skills leave him in high demand and leads to him being offered jobs that appear simple on the surface but is not what it seems.

Recommended to me off the back of having just order Broken Homes, the fourth Ben Aaronovitch book, this book is very much in the same vein of Aaronovitch’s series, set in London and written from the first person point of view.  The comedy is in a similar vein to to the Peter Grant novels so it is likely they both have similar or the same audiences.

What’s different though are the styles of magic used in each series. Aaronovitch’s wizards are able to use all types of magic and skills (providing they have learned how to use it!) but Jacka‘s mages are able to use only one type of magic. The main character Alex Verus is a chance mage or seer if you will, able to use divination magic to see the future and it often saves his life.  This does not mean the fight scenes are no less thrilling than Aaronovitch’s. I actually believe his scenes are better due to the fact that Verus is not a battle mage so often has to use his cunning rather than his magic to save him when he is in a tight spot. This is not to say that Verus is unable to use magic in battles but rather that Jacka is more inventive due to the limitation he places on Verus so has to give him other means to fight, such as the use of magical items and of elemental spirits.

The concept of Elsewhere is also intriguing, allowing Jacka’s characters to talk even when apart but I do question as to whether Elsewhere could possibly be used to better effect for other purposes.

Jacka’s Fated has a darker edge to it from the outset, unlike Aaronovitch’s, and this actually provides a more intriguing and adult feel to it. This could be down to the fact that Verus is a mercenary of sorts who tries to keep a low profile and is very willing to kill or seriously injure as he has very little of the principles and rules and regulations that curb Grant and Nightingale. The organisation of Jacka’s magical word would indicate that there would be more regulation and limitations to what Verus can do but in actual fact, because all the mages in Jacka’s series (especially the dark mages) seem to be driven by greed and a lust for power,  it makes the world more dangerous so leaves more room for different adventures and scrapes for Verus to get involved with.

In general, this novel is a great novel and is highly recommended if you are a Ben Aaronovitch fan or even a Derek Landy (Skulduggery Pleasant) fan as all share very similar themes, comedy and, arguably, character types so would appeal.