Unusual work habits of great writers

Any odd writing habits anyone? Me, I tend to edit and rewrite in the morning and write in the afternoon and the evening.

Nicholas C. Rossis

John Green has written such celebrated works as The Fault In Our Stars and Paper Towns, but not without sacrificing copious keyboards along the way. In a Huffington Post Live conversation on Thursday, the young adult novelist revealed his “weirdest” writing ritual: He develops working relationships with the keyboards at his desktop computer.

“I switch keyboards every draft and then if — here’s my problem — if something isn’t going well, I throw out the keyboard,” he confessed to host Nancy Redd.

“Keyboards are only like five bucks,” he added, but if a piece of writing is going well, he’ll “keep the keyboard.”

Strange habits

Last week, I mentioned the writing tools great authors use. Writers, though, are a notoriously strange and -often- superstitious bunch, as seen from Green’s example. For some more unusual work habits, you may refer to the excellent infographic below, also prepared by the talented Robert Morris

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Top Writing Tools of Famous Authors

Pen and paper? Notebook? Laptop? Typewriter? Other? What do you write with?

Nicholas C. Rossis

My secret weapon is using a two screen layout for my PC. This allows me to work on the story on one monitor, while researching on the other. If you’re curious as to what writing tools great authors prefer, you may refer to the excellent infographic below, which was prepared by Robert Morris and the lovely people over at NinjaEssays.com. So, what is your favorite tool?

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

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Camp NaNoWriMo

Camp-Participant-2015-Web-Banner

Yes, you’ve guessed it, I am doing Camp in April.

My mind decided I was doing it  back in November when I got the idea for the main character really. I’ve been thinking and developing the idea since, especially the plot, as I had pretty much none when I first got the idea. My first inkling on the idea was just the character really. Think Valka from How To Train Your Dragon 2 in the modern-day and you have an idea of what I’m thinking. You can read my current synopsis of my story by visiting my Camp NaNoWriMo Novel Info page.

At least, I have my main character, things I want to happen and, thanks to my search for a novel title, a very basic plot idea and know how it ends. This is how I normally write anyway. As long as I know what needs to happen, the main points, I can usually work from there. This time around however I definitely think I need to be more of a plotter rather than the pantser because the story potentially takes place over 3 years and is a bit more of a mystery thing. It’s for that mystery part I need to work on some of the mythology at least to allow me to plot out the key points for the story.

It also doesn’t help that the planning I have so far is still not fixed. I am even messing with a romance sub plot line to help me, should things go awry and I get stuck. I do have just over a week to go before the event starts so I have the time to at least hammer a bit more plot into place to make sure I can get something written in April.

Are you doing Camp NaNoWriMo in April? Know what you are doing or are you waiting until the last-minute to decide? Are you in a cabin or going solo? Feel free to comment below!

How to Prep for Camp NaNoWriMo

Camp starts on April 1st. Are you ready?

Caffeinated Constellations

Even though I trekked the NaNoWriMo challenge for the very first time last November, I have been participating in Camp NaNoWriMo for three years now. Two events take place each year, and I have participated in five of them. This has resulted in four novellas. There is nothing else like the knowledge that you finished the first draft of a writing project in a month. I’m addicted to the feeling of accomplishment knowing that one more story is out of my system. I also personally use the sessions as writing exercises; I like to see what I can get away with in my writing in terms of experimental eccentricities.

This year, Camp NaNoWriMo’s sessions will take place in April and July. With about five weeks to prepare, I have made a list for the Camper to pack with them on this trip. All the Camper needs is an idea, which…

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And the idea of just wandering off to a cafe with a notebook and writing and seeing where that takes me for awhile is just bliss: J. K. Rowling

What writer doesn’t dream of this every now and then?

What writer doesn’t dream of this every now and then?

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